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So the YoT got a job. He has is Sign All The Stuff meeting on Friday… - Tactical Ninja Page 2

Jun. 26th, 2013

09:25 am

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So the YoT got a job. He has is Sign All The Stuff meeting on Friday and that's where he'll find out what his shifts will be and how many hours he'll be working.

Yes, it's at McDonald's. He'll be flipping burgers. Or more likely working in the cafe because of the barista thing.

Don't give me that shitCollapse )

What he does with that is completely up to him - but the fact that he has it makes me think of the 13 year old kid that rescued himself 5 years ago, and I'm damn proud that my kid has a job at McDonald's.

Now, if the universe could just materialise a job for fuvenusrs when she gets here, I think that'll be all the job-requirements of my little community pretty much sorted.

H'hear me universe? Step up.

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From:jaelle_n_gilla
Date:June 26th, 2013 07:59 am (UTC)
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Woohoot! Hey, a job is a job, and a start is a start. If he can get free ed and full pay while doing that, it's a good job. The company doesn't matter so much. And, hey, despite all the fretting he's got it pretty quickly, right? Good on him!

It's always a bit funny when I read about those starter jobs in the US or NZ or Aussieland, even. Germany still has this very traditional way of apprenticeship. You go to school, you decide either on highschool and possibly university after that, or you decide on an apprenticeship and "job school" along with that when you are 16. Then you train your chosen profession half on site and hands on, and half in school, with all the theory and math and all that behind it. You have a test at the end of, say, 3 years, and then you are an adept, or companion, or whatever the word is in English. You can go for master then, or not. Your choice. It's a career path rather than wondering what to do with your life...

Sounds like Freemasons, or a fantasy roleplay, right? ;-)
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From:tatjna
Date:June 26th, 2013 08:21 pm (UTC)
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Heh. It also sounds like the educational model for vocational training that is currently considered to be the one the Western world should be following.

Our government is trying to do a similar thing by starting things called Trade Academies, but the difference between Germany and NZ is that the German government backed its policy with legislation and funding to ensure that workplaces and education providers would work together. The NZ government just went "Hey you lot, we know we set you up in competition for the last 20 years, but you have to collaborate now, and by the way we expect better results but we're cutting your funding."

(hehe, spot the near-rant from someone who works in the sector)
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From:richdrich
Date:June 27th, 2013 12:55 am (UTC)
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How does it work in Germany if you decide aged 20 or so, having served an apprenticeship as a toolmaker or whatever, that you want to become a policy analyst? Can you get funded to go to university? Do you need qualifications?
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From:jaelle_n_gilla
Date:July 1st, 2013 07:39 pm (UTC)
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University funding is a different matter altogether. First of all, to be able to go to university you need to finish all 12 (used to be 13) years of school and the final exams that prove you are "mature" enough for uni. If your parents earn enough, they fund you. If they don't, you get a certain allowance from the state. The university itself is free or nearly free. I think that's different through the states but it's maybe 1000€ per year, nothing like the US colleges.

So if you decide to do an apprenticeship after 10 years of school, you are barred from university unless you do your missing years and exams later. If your apprenticeship is after the full school time, you can either get funding from your parents or parent-independent funding. I think that works after 32 months of having had a real job.

It's rather complicated, I'm afraid. but the gist is you have to qualify with school grades, rather than work time.

The other option many people follow is working your way up and sideways from the apprenticeship to whatever comes your way. I started as a biologist, went through programming databases (of laboratories) and then into project management, and now into clinical study management. All of the latter can be studied at university, and I did none and still got the jobs. So it isn't as if a thatcher is a thatcher forever more.
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From:nessaneko
Date:June 26th, 2013 10:24 am (UTC)
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"the best thing a smart kid like the YoT could do is teach himself programming and then create a startup doing something that springs from his fertile imagination that's never been thought of before, and make millions."

This STEM snobbery (because let's face it, it is snobbery, and it's pretty much entirely from people who've gone into STEM fields) really, really fucks me off. I'm a pretty smart woman. In fact, I'm smart enough to be doing a Masters, and I've got a whole bunch of creativity on the side. But programming/maths/science/tech stuff has never been where I'm interested in or where my passions lie. That kind of shit up there makes such huge assumptions that everyone who is smart is smart in the same way, and that the world needs nothing ever except programmers and entrepreneurs running start-ups. Actually, the world fucking needs policy analysts. And lawyers. And mechanics. And plumbers, and builders, and seamstresses, and yes, the world needs people to flip burgers. Ugh.
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From:tatjna
Date:June 27th, 2013 01:18 am (UTC)
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One could say the same about STEM folks who fail to understand the underlying realities of the people that they're trying to influence.
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From:laoke
Date:June 26th, 2013 11:12 am (UTC)
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I'm firmly of the opinion that most interesting people have no clue what they want to do much before 30. Hell, I didn't actually start with the flipping of the burgers, I worked my way up to that from scrubbing potatoes for the local Fish n'Chip shop!

He'll be fine. Hell, the customer service training alone is worth its weight in gold - it means he can make a claim to be customer service focused and back it up with qualifications (I'm pretty sure McDs runs KiwiHost certification) when he moves on.

Good first job. Well done, YoT!

Although, if he's got a job and all - is he really still a youth? Is he not trending with rapid speed towards that mark of maturity we call adulthood?

Edited at 2013-06-26 11:13 am (UTC)
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From:tatjna
Date:June 26th, 2013 08:22 pm (UTC)
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This is a question I'm asking myself. Technically he's a youth till he's 25, but I think he needs a new name here. Open for suggestions.
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From:laoke
Date:June 28th, 2013 03:31 am (UTC)
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I think 'Adult of the Future' might be just vague enough to cover everything >.>
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From:meathiel
Date:June 26th, 2013 03:34 pm (UTC)
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A job is a job is a job ... so what???
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From:tatjna
Date:June 26th, 2013 08:23 pm (UTC)
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It's amazing how many people say that about working retail. ;-)

I guess it's a good thing that at least some people enjoy it, eh?
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