November 4th, 2013

yar

Plague house

We are sick. Both of us. I blame my boss, who came to work one day with the lurgy. We sent him home, but two weeks later, both myself and my colleague came down with it on the same day. And Dr Wheel the following day. Now I am a snot factory and he is heading that way fast.

FEEL SORRY FOR US

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On the upside, I'm still able to do repetitive tasks and since right now I'm making chainmail, I am able to assuage my guilt through productivity somehow.

So, oh flist - please make me feel better by telling me I'm not the only one who has a ridiculous response to being sick, and tell me your stories of how you are just as silly. Or someone you know is. Someone? Anyone?

Meanwhile, Aristotal is going again. Sadly, the rescue didn't work. Luckily, I have a lot of cloud backups and only really lost my games. There is also something liberating about a fresh OS install. The previous was only a year old therefore not that messy, but still - OMG empty pictures folder!

And I lost my Dragon Age savegames, which means I'll have to replay my headcanon playthrough. Sounds like the perfect activity for a sick brain ackshully...
warden

Knight-Captain Cullen How To, Part 7: Breastplate 1

Time taken: 15 hours.
Materials: 1-1.2mm leather in brown (approximately 8sq feet), expanded PVC foam board, Wonderflex, wool batting, waxed nylon thread*, 9mm 810 cap nickel domed rivets, contact glue, hot glue, Rub 'n' Buff in silver leaf, thread, previously made belt.
Tools: Craft knife, pen, heat gun, metre ruler, scissors, edge beveller, speedy stitcher, mallet, rivet anvil.
Techniques: Leatherwork, sewing, plastic thermomoulding.
Difficulty level: Hard on the hands, involves a bit of shaping and tailoring, otherwise straightforward.

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Next steps: the back (fabric regalia jacket part, back straps) and sleeves (more fabric and chain mail). Then this part will be done.

* While I would like to use linen thread, I've not had much luck with it under the kind of tension I need for stitching leather. It breaks at the eye of the speedy stitcher needle, so I have resigned myself to using nylon thread. Woe.