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Not the only one who cuts their broadbill into manageable chunks - Tactical Ninja

May. 9th, 2014

10:17 am - Not the only one who cuts their broadbill into manageable chunks

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Yesterday my Grownup Coat arrived in the mail, and today I wore it to work. I love it, it's all warm and snuggly and grownup-feeling. It's this one. I call it a Grownup Coat because it's the first time I've ever spent over $100 on a coat that wasn't an oilskin or for snowboarding. It's for my walks to work in Wellington winters and I got it from Hikoi at a $90 discount.

They actually emailed me when I ordered it and told me it was out of stock, and they'd have to order it in but if I waited a couple of weeks they'd be having their May sale and it'd be cheaper. I thought that was pretty nice of them. Still cost me $270 though. And I can feel the difference in quality from my usual $50 jobs. I expect this coat will last me several years. Yes, I am excited about a coat.


Yesterday I looked up recipes for swordfish on the internet. There are lots. I had heard that it's versatile as fish go, but was still surprised at how popular it is. I guess because in NZ it's a rarity - try finding any to buy in the shops - so you just don't see recipes for it as part of our culture.

However, I discovered that you can pan cook it, grill it, barbeque it and roast it. I selected 'pan' recipes, and ended up choosing one that's fried in a cast iron pan, then roasted and coated in a garlic/pepper/butter/lemon sauce rendered in the pan leftovers.

OM NOM NOM NOM. Here's a picture:



I think the broadbill 'steaks' look like tofu. This is because the frozen hunk I got was so bloody huge I had to cut it into manageable chunks with a meat saw, and that ended up making these rectangular pieces. I assure you though, these were better than any tofu. Here is a picture of me being The Happy Chef Who Totally Isn't Trying To Sell You Something:



*ahem* Anyway, for those who are interested, I like it. It's a white-fleshed fish like a snapper or kingfish, but oily like tuna or marlin. An interesting combination. It holds together well after freezing, and that cooking method left it juicy and tender. Some people say it has a strong flavour, but I didn't notice it being all that strong myself - possibly because I'm used to the strong and slightly metallic flavour of the shark that normally goes in fish and chips.

The general consensus is that we like swordfish and now Dr Wheel says I have to catch one. To which I say "Perhaps not in my kayak."

Anyway, the other thing that arrived in the mail yesterday was my new cloche to replace the little greenhouse that's now too battered to cope with full time active duty in the windy spot. I put it up in less than 15 minutes:



The plants you see in it are the chillies and capsicums that I've been talking bragging about lately, which suffered a bit from losing their protection but are now back in relatively wind-free safety. The cloth is Mikroclima, which is a wind and frost break that lets water through while providing some shade and some insulating properties. It's not as good as the greenhouse would have been, but less likely to end up in the neighbours'.

And, it'll keep the white butterfly off my broccolis, damnit! Note the white thing in the background, which is my makeshift tulle tent for the other two broccolis I'm trying to protect from the little white bastards. *muttermutter*


OK, so while I was googling for the link below about NZ's swordfish fishery, I found this video by following a link "Giant shark attacks swordfish." Unlike most of those claims, this vid is the real deal. The swordfish is about 150kg by the looks of it, and it gets monstered by an even bigger mako shark. The guys videoing it know what they are doing, and keep up a good narrative throughout. If you're interested in what NZ's blue water contains, have a look. It might put you off swimming though, eh?

* While not included under the October 1987 moratorium banning commercial fishing for marlin, swordfish can not be commercially targeted and are limited to 'allowable bycatch' throughout New Zealand's 200 mile exclusive economic zone. This essentially makes broadbill a recreational species, at least in principle.

Comments:

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From:pombagira
Date:May 8th, 2014 10:30 pm (UTC)
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thats a great coat!! and it does look warm and snuggly.. whoot

also yay fish for dinners.. noms


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From:tatjna
Date:May 8th, 2014 10:30 pm (UTC)
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There is a Polly-sized bit of swordfish here for you - just a matter of transferring it between freezers. ;-)
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From:pombagira
Date:May 8th, 2014 10:33 pm (UTC)
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*squee* exciting.. and noms.. and thank you! we will make plans this evening at fidels. :D

:D
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From:richdrich
Date:May 8th, 2014 10:30 pm (UTC)
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Anthony Bourdain doesn't eat swordfish

Three-foot long parasitic worms, bah! Chop them up and make them into sushi..
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From:tatjna
Date:May 8th, 2014 10:34 pm (UTC)
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Dude's too fussy IMO.

'Sides, I have yet to come across anyone who would cook and eat the bit of fish that has a worm in it. Broadbill are big enough so if you find one, you can chuck that out and have plenty of perfectly good flesh left. Seems unlikely you'd find a worm in a broadbill steak, just saying.

Barracouta get those flesh-worms too, but they are smaller fish with smaller worms so it's harder to avoid them, and the flesh isn't all that good. I wouldn't bother with those...
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From:meathiel
Date:May 9th, 2014 07:03 am (UTC)
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I really like swordfish ... well, the Mediterranean variety, don't know if that's any different. You don't get it a lot here, though, and usually you get it grilled. But ... nom, nom ... :D
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From:tatjna
Date:May 11th, 2014 09:41 pm (UTC)
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I had a look at Wikipedia, and from what I can tell they are all the same species and highly migratory, so the Mediterranean ones are probably the same.

And I totally agree - yummy!
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From:prelley
Date:May 11th, 2014 12:02 pm (UTC)
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A nice coat makes all the difference during the winter!
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From:tatjna
Date:May 11th, 2014 09:33 pm (UTC)
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It really does. I've never really had a good winter coat before, but this one makes me want to go outside.
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From:russiandolls
Date:May 11th, 2014 09:32 pm (UTC)
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That is a VERY nice coat. But I would say that, being a huge fan of duffel coats, to the point that I'm in the process of getting a copy of my old duffel coat made (I bought it 10 years ago for $50 at Spacesuit, so I'm retiring it and upgrading to actual wool). Yup, perfectly OK to be excited about a coat.
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From:tatjna
Date:May 11th, 2014 09:33 pm (UTC)
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I am liking it quite a lot! So.Warm.
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From:pundigrion
Date:May 13th, 2014 04:43 pm (UTC)
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Oooh, that does look like a nice warm coat! And quite a bit more stylish than mine for that matter. I might keep it in mind if mine ever dies.

I'll be watching your mini-tunnels with interest! Every coldframe or tube we have ever tried has been killed by the wind here.
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