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Crossing the Gentle Annie. Eeee! - Tactical Ninja

Dec. 11th, 2013

07:27 am - Crossing the Gentle Annie. Eeee!

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I am off driving round the countryside chasing plasterers for the next couple of days, so have some sheep to tide you over:




Me - 7; Suffolks - 0.

Well, technically it's Me - 5; Suffolks - 0, and then a couple of others. But yeah.

Comments:

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From:nick_101
Date:December 10th, 2013 08:47 pm (UTC)
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They certainly look different before and after.
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From:kehleyr
Date:December 10th, 2013 09:48 pm (UTC)
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Aaaw <3
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From:m_danson
Date:December 11th, 2013 03:33 pm (UTC)
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Sheep!
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From:pundigrion
Date:December 13th, 2013 01:30 am (UTC)
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Tasty sheepies!

Suffolks and Texels (and various crosses thereof) are the most popular sheep around here by far.
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From:tatjna
Date:December 13th, 2013 01:35 am (UTC)
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It's rare to see Suffolks in their purebred form around here, but there's a definite market for the rams as a terminal sire. I think there's a view in NZ that sheep must grow both meat and wool in order to be worth keeping, although given the prices of wool I am not sure this is a financially sound idea any more. And Suffolk wool, while spinners seem to like it, is not a commercial proposition because of the black fibres that grow all through it.

I like them as a breed but a lot of the ones I've encountered have had really bad feet. The ones in the picture are registered purebreds and they are lovely examples. AND they have good feet. Therefore I told the owners they are duty-bound to breed from them, just so more good quality Suffolks are out there.
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From:pundigrion
Date:December 13th, 2013 01:43 am (UTC)
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They are more common as crosses here, but quite a lot of people keep some pure for show. Fairs and 4-H kids tend to favour purebreds a bit.

It's hard to find their wool to buy here, most of it gets burned. Shame since while there is a bit of kemp it is also really nice for socks. Not so soft but very sproingy and it makes a nice cushy yarn underfoot and wears super well. Dying takes care of the odd off coloured hairs, but of course wool pool only wants white even here, le sigh...

Don't have any foot woes with them here that I have heard of, but we also don't have much trouble with damp. Doesn't rain here quite as much I would guess. I know in the damp Pacific Northwest they are not so popular!
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