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Why German is awesome, and other tales - Tactical Ninja

Jun. 13th, 2012

09:10 am - Why German is awesome, and other tales

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First, a win. Remember this? In which I took Mighty Ape to task for assuming that the reader (and thus the gamer) would be a man? They fixed it. Which I believe now means I have to buy Diablo III off them. What a shame! ;-D

Last night's class was bench pressing. This doesn't mean lying on your back and pressing barbells. Instead it means my partner and I going from both on our feet to him pressing me in a standing position. I should say that he's already pressed me in shoulder stand/cathedral position, and also while I stand on his hands, but this one's a new one. And the best bit is that apart from the jumping to get up there all I have to do is make like a plank. And the drops are fun. This partner thing is growing on me.


You know how German is sort of like lego-language (as described to me by the inimitable Jan) in that you can make up new words by stringing words together, and that us native English speakers believe this is why German is the language that has all the words for emotions that you need a whole paragraph to describe in English?*

You know, like schadenfreude?

Well it turns out that the word that describes when you come up with a witty retort when it's too late to deliver it, is actually French: L'esprit de l'escalier, which means 'staircase wit'. OK that's actually three words (or possibly more, I don't really know French grammar and how it works).

This is your cue to tell me that actually, there's a word for that in German too, and it's a single, snappy word that everyone else knows except me.

*cough*

So next term I've decided to do the beginner hand balancing at the circus hub, to try and get my handstands properly sorted. And I might carry on with the acro as well because I'm enjoying it so much but I'll take that one under advisement from Mark because he'll know whether it's worth it or whether it'll be just going over the same material again, and possibly have some alternative ideas.

I do like having an evening class once a week that's physically active, but I'm not sure how I'd cope with two, especially two nights in a row. Last night when I got home I was so high on endorphins that I don't really even remember eating before bed. This might be because Tuesday's also PT day and yesterday Aaron had a damn good go at making me throw up. On the upside, pretty soon I reckon I'll be able to row 2500m in 10 minutes**.

I am going to be the fittest granny in the rest home, oh hell yes.


* There's probably a German word for that.
** I have no idea if this is good, but it sounds good to me.

Finally, another win. A modified version of my rant about credit checks from yesterday has gone up on the blog at NZ Council for Civil Liberties as a guest post. Naturally I'm now thinking of things I could have added to it, like how if you're a government and you want a flexible workforce (read: one you can do whatever you want to without repercussion), the best way to do that is to weed out those who would object by allowing employers to screen folks who won't allow invasive checks at interview time. But hey, for my first bit of political soapboxing outside of LJ, I'm pretty happy with it.

Now to get some of my drug rants published in effective places.

Comments:

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From:pombagira
Date:June 12th, 2012 09:26 pm (UTC)
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wheee... traction! most excellent!! <-- credit checks *beams*

i like traction..

err yeah.. i am so with the words today




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From:ms_hecubus
Date:June 12th, 2012 09:42 pm (UTC)
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There's a German word for feeling embarrassment for someone else, fremdschämen. I just love that!

Now, if my mom's family would have kept up speaking German in the home I might know some of it, but none of them speak German anymore. :(
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From:tatjna
Date:June 12th, 2012 10:49 pm (UTC)
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I kind of wish I knew German because it's just such a cool language for expressing yourself accurately. ;-)
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From:thesecondcircle
Date:June 12th, 2012 09:42 pm (UTC)
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Treppenwitz -- stairs wit
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From:thesecondcircle
Date:June 12th, 2012 09:45 pm (UTC)
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But the best German word is Antibabypille -- aka birth control pills
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From:tatjna
Date:June 12th, 2012 10:49 pm (UTC)
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Did you just make that up using German Lego Rules, or is it actually a word?
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From:misshapen_fro
Date:June 13th, 2012 12:10 am (UTC)
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It's actually a word! I read it somewhere in one of my German classes.
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From:tatjna
Date:June 13th, 2012 12:13 am (UTC)
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German wins at everything! Maybe I should start learning it.
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From:morbid_curious
Date:June 13th, 2012 04:46 am (UTC)
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http://www.dict.cc/deutsch-englisch/Treppenwitz.html

Though it's just a translation of the French that the Germans made up using their own Lego Rules.

Also, the German word for the composition of words is Wortzusammensetzung, or literally word-together-putting :-)
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From:goffburd
Date:June 13th, 2012 07:46 am (UTC)
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Excellent rant - we're heading this way too...

I love German. There's a fantastic word for a tribal tattoo on the lower back, much beloved by many, Arschgeweih - or arse antlers! Personally I think it sounds even better in English.



Edited at 2012-06-13 07:47 am (UTC)
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From:tatjna
Date:June 13th, 2012 08:15 pm (UTC)
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Hahaha awesome! Arse antlers! I'm totally incorporating that into my lexicon.
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From:goffburd
Date:June 25th, 2012 09:06 pm (UTC)
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I think you've got to! If you really do want to learn more German, I've got quite a few German friends on my flist - they'd be happy to give you loads of interesting vocabulary!
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From:plantgirl
Date:June 13th, 2012 07:12 pm (UTC)

it's actually five words :/

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Directly translated, "L'esprit de l'escalier" is "The spirit of the stairs." Each l-apostrophe in your phrase is a contracted article (le or la, depending on the gender of the noun to which it's attached). The French think it's important for things to sound good & be easy to say, so they use a lot of contractions & other tricky things to obtain that goal.

The munchkin I take care of has a book of trucks. In german. And every type of loader, digger, hauler, & firetruck has it's own reaalllllllllllly long name, depending on how specialized it is. I love & hate reading it to her.
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From:tatjna
Date:June 13th, 2012 08:14 pm (UTC)

Re: it's actually five words :/

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Yeah, after I thought about it for a while I figured the l' was probably short for le/la. But it still rolls off the tongue beautifully.
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