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For those not in NZ, P is the kiwi word for methamphetamine - Tactical Ninja

Mar. 18th, 2016

07:29 pm - For those not in NZ, P is the kiwi word for methamphetamine

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Cold damp homes, not P, the health culprit, says academic.

Fwiw, I think the headline is misleading. Cold and damp homes hurt far more kids' health (won't anybody think of the children?), but P contamination still exists and is a problem worth addressing.

Of course people do it in private houses for the same reason that people who are struggling with P don't come forward - it's Class A and that means possession is 6 months and $1000, manufacture is life. Life in NZ generally means at least 10 years.

P is a drug of poor people, and the laws around it make it easy to keep people poor. Neoliberal economics requires inequality, a desperate underclass that is easy to exploit to keep the cost of business down.

It bothers me that this happens because I know from my study that the poor are not using more drugs, they are just being disproportionately punished for doing what the middle class can afford to do with fewer consequences through having access to more expensive and less harmful drugs.

Comments:

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From:pundigrion
Date:March 18th, 2016 04:06 pm (UTC)
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That is an interesting clickbait headline on so many levels.
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From:randomdreams
Date:March 19th, 2016 02:24 am (UTC)
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I was reading an article on how race relations factors into politics in the US recently, and a recurring theme was closely related: how drug laws were used as selective racist discrimination, and how there's a widely held belief that the drugs in question were actually being supplied by some parts of the government in an attempt to reverse cultural shifts resulting from the civil rights movement.
Which is very US-centric, but I think the idea is certainly there across multiple cultures.
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From:tatjna
Date:March 19th, 2016 02:38 am (UTC)
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Yeah, the link between drug laws and racism is well established - and certainly it plays out in NZ. If you're b brown and you're caught with weed, you're 3x more likely to be arrested and if you're arrested you're 3x more likely to be convicted, and etc.

Leads to 50% of the prison population being Maori, when only 15% of the total population is.

Of course, the US was the ringleader in the War on Drugs, and the history of the drugs/racism link there goes back to the 1800s when opium was used to discriminate against the Chinese. So I think it's fair to say that the whole drug war is US-centric, and other countries have just followed along.
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From:tatjna
Date:March 19th, 2016 02:42 am (UTC)
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I read an article about the so-called crack-baby moral panic, in which the crack epidemic was examined in the context of Reaganomics.

Essentially, in the early 1980s the jobs normally filled by urban black people were being outsourced to India for cheap, leaving a large and visible group of unemployed people living in central city ghettos.

Introducing crack into these environments provided a simple means of blaming the people for their own misfortune and thus justifying not addressing the underlying economic cause of the problem - "Oh look, black people using drugs are unemployable" rather than "We made you unemployed and now you're using drugs."

It's sickening, tbh.


Edited at 2016-03-19 02:46 am (UTC)
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From:randomdreams
Date:March 19th, 2016 03:13 am (UTC)
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The one writer that specifically stuck in my memory made the claim that in the late 1970's, black communities were making fairly serious strides towards a sort of self-determination culture, with the starts of community support networks motivated in part by groups like the black panthers. Since those networks were overtly socialist, they were the focus of both Nixon's benign neglect policies and more targeted destabilization.

There's currently a huge buy-guns-open-carry movement gaining strength in the US, but it is very, very white. Events like the Tamir Rice shooting, where a 12 year old holding a toy gun was immediately gunned down by police, where white mass murderers are captured alive after hours of negotiations, tend to strongly reinforce the idea that the Black Panthers are still seen as an unacceptably terrifying expression of self-determination to people who, aside from their color, are engaging in very similar activities. Which is to say, I don't think it's coincidence that there are so many laws about felons and gun ownership, and so many black people convicted of drug felonies.

Edited at 2016-03-19 03:14 am (UTC)
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From:tatjna
Date:March 19th, 2016 03:25 am (UTC)
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It really isn't.
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From:randomdreams
Date:March 19th, 2016 02:25 am (UTC)
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btw thanks for the comment about neoliberalism and economic inequality. It fits in well with some critique-of-society stuff I've been thinking about lately.
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